How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change

GreenBiz

How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change. fisheries adapt to climate impacts; catalyzing the growth of a "new sustainable seafood industry," including aquaculture, mariculture and plant- and cell-based seafood alternatives.

This coastal Louisiana tribe is using generations of resilience to handle the pandemic

GreenBiz

The engineering of waterways, oil and gas development and sea level rise have erased 2,000 square miles from the Louisiana coastline since the 1930s. The engineering of waterways, oil and gas development and sea level rise have erased 2,000 square miles from the Louisiana coastline since the 1930s. Climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions threatens to raise the sea level by more than six feet this century.

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The results are in from the Arctic’s annual checkup

Grist

And some fish populations in the Bering Sea, which supplies about 40 percent of the American seafood catch, have begun to migrate north as waters warm, threatening food webs. Through global sea-level rise, the release of permafrost carbon, and its role in regulating global weather patterns, the Arctic is vitally connected to people worldwide.”. If the trend continues, the sheet alone would add an additional 3 inches of sea-level rise by the end of the century.

How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change

AGreenLiving

fisheries adapt to climate impacts; catalyzing the growth of a “new sustainable seafood industry,” including aquaculture, mariculture and plant- and cell-based seafood alternatives. Excerpt from: How a Blue New Deal charts a course for a sustainable sea change.

This coastal Louisiana tribe is using generations of resilience to handle the pandemic

AGreenLiving

The engineering of waterways, oil and gas development and sea level rise have erased 2,000 square miles from the Louisiana coastline since the 1930s. The engineering of waterways, oil and gas development and sea level rise have erased 2,000 square miles from the Louisiana coastline since the 1930s. Climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions threatens to raise the sea level by more than six feet this century.