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Ocean Conservation: Ocean Acidification and the Impacts of Fish Migration

Green Tech Challenge

Put simply, ocean acidification is the imbalance of chemical content in ocean water; whereby there is increased acidity, and upward temperature changes. The ocean has experienced a 26% pH drop in the last century. Ocean acidification has negative effects on sea-life and the ecosystem. Another concerning effect of ocean acidification is fish migration, which has been occurring in large and increasing numbers.

Climate change is adversely affecting childrens health worldwide

AGreenLiving

Today’s children are facing climate crisis-related health issues, warns The Lancet ’s Countdown on Health and Climate Change, the annual research collaboratively conducted by 35 global institutions. Unless significant intervention takes place, global warming and climate change will negatively “shape the well-being of an entire generation.”

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Rising sea temperatures and coral loss: “Most detailed scientific picture to date”

Envirotec Magazine

The report, the sixth edition produced by the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), is said to provide the most detailed scientific picture to date of the toll elevated temperatures have taken on the world’s reefs.

Can manufacturing green sand beaches save our planet?

AGreenLiving

It sounds too good to be true — spread some rocks on a beach and the ocean will do the work to remove carbon dioxide from the air, reversing global warming. When rain falls on volcanic rocks, it weathers them down, then flows into the ocean. There, oceans further break down the rocks. Carbon dioxide removed from the air becomes bicarbonate, which helps grow the shells of marine organisms and is stored in limestone on the ocean floor.

UN report: Ocean-based climate action could deliver a fifth of emissions cuts needed to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C

Envirotec Magazine

Ocean-based climate action can play a much bigger role in shrinking the world’s carbon footprint than was previously thought. It could deliver up to a fifth (21%, or 11 GtCO2e) of the annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions cuts needed in 2050 to limit global temperature rise to 1.5°C. Our future health and prosperity are closely linked to the state of the ocean,” said Erna Solberg, co-chair of the High Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy and Prime Minister of Norway.

'Every fraction of warming matters': World careering towards irreversible climate impacts, top scientists warn

Business Green

Landmark IPCC report provides wave of stark warnings, but stresses that rapidly putting the global economy on course to net zero emissions by 2050 could hugely reduce the escalating impacts that will result from a warmer world. The changes we experience will increase with additional warming.".

'Climate breakdown has already begun': Green figures react to IPCC's landmark climate warning

Business Green

Roundup of reaction from politicians, NGOs, and business figures as the world's top climate scientists serve up latest evidence on scale of potential climate cataclysm ahead. Global heating is affecting every region on Earth, with many of the changes becoming irreversible. "We